Cats do not require much supervised exercise and, consequently, they are excellent pets for the elderly and for people with busy lives.

Although cats are friendly and emotional by nature, they are noted for being unfaithful. Many cats have two or more homes and may develop a routine where they spend part of each day with different people. It is common for a cat to breakfast at one houses, lunch at a second and dine at a third; this can lead to obesity on what appears to be a normal diet.

Taking care of your cat means providing it with the lifestyle that suits its needs. Ideally, cats should be allowed to roam freely outdoors. This enables they get adequate exercise, and can satisfy their natural curiosity and develop their hunting instincts all at the same time. In urban areas, if you live in an apartment, it may be safer to house your cat indoors permanently. In this case, you will need to provide plenty of opportunity for play. Cats become bored easily, and a lack of stimulation may encourage the onset of listlessness and ill health.

In the household the cat will need a place of its own to rest and sleep,its own food and water, and a litter tray for hygiene purposes. If you want the cat to be house-trained, you will also need to make sure it can get in and out of the building easily. This may mean installing a cat flap.